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  The North tower of the West Façade of the cathedral of Chartres was, apparently, the earliest of the above-ground structures added to the building constructed by Bishop Fulbert which has survived into our own time.
  On the ground floor of the south façade of this tower we find three extraordinary figurative capitals, which are rare, precious evidences of pre-Royal Portal Chartrain figure style in stone, their decorative and iconographic significance no doubt do their placement as part of some no longer exant entrance-way to the crypt of Fulbert's cathedral.

  The most prominent  –and, perhaps, most significant– of capitals sports two griffins, drinking at a chalice-like font.

 

 

 

 

  A second capital depicts an inigmatic scene consisting of an archer-centaur, carrying a youth on his back, attacking a female figure.
  

 

 

  The third capital, which gives us a better idea of the figure style which this workshop might have espoused, appears to depict a Samson, who has dismounted from his horse to attack a quite magnificent Lion with his pruned lance. Samson (if that is indeed who he is) sports a rather typical hat, and there is an inigmatic figure lying between Samson and the Lion.

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